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Cat Pregnancy: How To Identify and Take Care of a Pregnant Cat

Cat Pregnancy Facts: Know When Your Cat is Pregnant

A pregnant cat should not alarm you. Actually, your cat was also once a kitten if that makes you feel any better. There is a whole bunch of information about this subject. However, we decided to make it easier for you by listing some of the main things you should know if you suspect that you have a pregnant cat on your hands.

HOW TO KNOW IF YOUR CAT IS PREGNANT

First, you’re going to have to be able to tell when a cat is pregnant. If your cat has a darker and enlarged nipple, then she’s probably pregnant. At around the third week of pregnancy, more pregnancy indications such as noticeable weight gain should be able to confirm your suspicion.

WHAT IS A PREGNANT FEMALE CAT CALLED?

A pregnant or nursing cat is called a queen, and as her pregnancy advances, the “queen” will become more demanding. Typically, she will crave for more attention, comfort, and affection – this may also be because the increasing size of her abdomen may cause her some discomfort. At advanced stages of the pregnancy, she will nap and eat for most parts of the day.

Once kittens are born, they are referred to as an intrigue of kittens. 

WHAT IS THE GESTATION PERIOD FOR CATS?

The average gestation period for cats is 65 to 69 days. This can seem short, well not until you put it side by side with humans. If you estimate a cat’s yearly age by multiplying it by seven (an approximation), then a cat’s gestation period actually lasts for 14 months. However, if a pregnant one-year-old cat is assumed to be a 15-year-old human being (another rough estimation), then the gestation period soars to 30 months – definitely not something you’ll wish for!

HOW MANY LITTERS AND KITTENS CAN A CAT HAVE?

Knowing how many kittens to expect can aid your preparation for the big day. According to ASPCA, on average, cats have around four to six kittens, and a very fertile cat can have up to two litters annually. The exact number will vary depending on the cat, however, nothing that an ultrasound and x-ray cannot reveal when you visit the vet. 

PREGNANT CAT NEEDS A COMFY SPOT

Your pregnant cat should stay inside. This is necessary for her safety. Wonderful Cats sells Beds for your cat to be comfortable in preparing the birthing time.

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APPETITE AND WEIGHT GAIN

Your cat will gain weight that may not be very obvious until the latter stage of her pregnancy, and this will be marked by increased appetite. This is not the time to monitor her weight (unless she was previously overweight). Remember she is now eating for more than one.

Like humans, cats have also been known to have morning cravings and sickness. If you find your cat eating anything other than food, be sure to check with your vet as she may have a condition known as pica and may require some supplements due to mineral or nutritional deficiency. 

CONTINUE THE NUTRITION!

Keep the food fairly same, however, start introducing protein into her meals. At advanced stages of the pregnancy, you may look to put her on a special formula for developing cats – this diet can be supplemented with canned food like sardine and continued until she has nursed and weaned her kittens. Your cat may need to eat smaller and more frequent meals as she has less room in her stomach now. Ensure to always make food and water available to her at all times. 

ADVANCED PREGNANCY CHANGES

Your cat may no longer fit into her litter box due to her increased size, and you shouldn’t scold her for that. She may also require assistance with wiping her bottom as her increased belly may not allow her to reach it. A wipe with a soft and moist cloth should do.

During the final week of pregnancy, your cat’s nipple may swell a little and leak a bit of milk. This is absolutely normal.

HOW TO AID THE DELIVERY OF A CAT

Just moments leading up to her delivery, your queen will restlessly roam the house looking for a comforting place to deliver her kittens. Be sure to close your closets and create a nice, clean and quiet corner with a paper box. She ultimately has to decide where she wants to have her kittens, so let her approve of a spot she likes, regardless of your preparations for her.

Keep the house as calm and quiet as possible. If she feels threatened during this period, she may withhold her labour, and this can be dangerous to both her and her unborn kittens. Try to not interfere with the birthing process, unless you absolutely have to. Once she successfully gives birth to all her kittens, move them to a clean and tidy area that has been prepared for their bedding.

Congrats, you now have new members several kittens in the family. Remember that the kittens have fragile immune systems and bones, and thus they should not be handled frequently by people – this goes without saying that the “queen mother” will be out to protect her kittens if she feels their safety is threatened in any way.

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